Welcome to International Network for Natural Sciences | INNSpub

Paper Details

Research Paper | April 1, 2015

VIEWS 3
| Download 2

Effect of budding method and graft union height on sweet cherry budding / mahaleb rootstock compatibility

Zahra Yazdani, Mehrdad Jafarpour, Majid Shams

Key Words:


Int. J. Agron. Agri. Res.6(4), 229-232, April 2015

Certification:

IJAAR 2015 [Generate Certificate]

Abstract

A study was done during the summer 2013 at Nursery in Isfahan, Iran. The native cultivar of sweet cherries (White and Black) was used as Scion and Mahaleb seedling were used as rootstock. The treatments consisted of three budding methods (T-budding, T with wood budding and Chip budding) at three different height (10-12, 20-25 and 30-35 cm) above ground. The experiment was laid out in a split plot- randomized complete block design with three replications. Bud take rate, bud sprouting rate, bud shoot diameter and bud shoot length were determined as experimental parameters after budding. All budding methods were found to be suitable for sweet cherry propagation. However, the highest mean percent of bud take and sprouting rate were obtained from Black sweet cherry scion with T-budding with wood performed at 10-12cm above ground. The highest mean shoot diameter were obtained in both scions with chip budding at 20-25 cm above ground and the highest shoot length were obtained from Black sweet cherry scion with T-budding with wood performed at 10-12 cm above ground. Beside of these findings, we suggest to all gardener and graftman in order to produce and propagate the sweet cherry with use of Mahaleb rootstock, use the Black sweet cherry (cultivar Ghaheri) as scion with T with wood budding at 10-20 or 20-25 cm height.

VIEWS 3

Copyright © 2015
By Authors and International Network for
Natural Sciences (INNSPUB)
http://innspub.net
This article is published under the terms of the Creative
Commons Attribution Liscense 4.0

Effect of budding method and graft union height on sweet cherry budding / mahaleb rootstock compatibility

Baryla P, Kaplan M. 2005. The Estimation of the Growth and the Branching of the Six Stocks Under the Cherry and Sweet cherry Trees. Acta Scientiarum Polonorum. Hortorum Cultus 4(1), 119-129.

Crasweller RM. 2005. Grafting and Propagating Fruit Trees. Penssylvania State University, 4.

Davarynejad GH, Shahriari F, Hamid H. 2008. Identification of Graft Incompatibility of Pear Cultivars on Quince Rootstock by Using Isozymes Banding Pattern and Starch. Asian J Plant Sciences 7, 109-112.

Guclu S, Koyuncu F. 2012. A Method for Prediction of Graft Incompatibility in Sweet cherry. Horticulture Agronomibotanici 40(1), 243-246.

Gulen  H,  Celik  M,  Polat  M,  Eris  A.  2005. Cambial Isoperoxidases Related to Graft Compatibility in Pear-Quince Graft Combinations. Turkish Journal of Agricultural Forestry 29, 83-89.

Hartmann HT, Kester DE, Davies JRF, Geneve RL. 1997. Plant Propagation Principles and Practies. Sixth Edition, Prentice Hall, New jersey.

Richard P, Marini P, Viclariy J. 2009. Growing Cherries in Virginia.Horticulture Virginia Techology, 422(18).

Mir M. Kummar A. 2011. Effect of Diffrent Methods, Times and Environmental Conditions on Grafting in Wulnut. International Journal of Farm Sciences 1(2), 17-22.

Mladin G, Ancu S, Mazilu C. 2010. A New Interspecific Vegetative Rootstock for Cherry Studies in the Nursery Stage in INterraction with Six Varieties. Scientific Papers of R.I.F.G. XXVI.

SUBMIT MANUSCRIPT

Style Switcher

Select Layout
Chose Color
Chose Pattren
Chose Background