Welcome to International Network for Natural Sciences | INNSpub

Paper Details

Research Paper | December 1, 2012

VIEWS 1
| Download 1

Effects of combination of ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid and microbial phytase on digestibility of calcium, phosphorous and mineralization parameters of tibia bone in broilers

Yahya Ebrahimnezhad, Mehdi Salmanzadeh, Naser Maheri-Sis, Abdolreza Yeganeh

Key Words:


Int. J. Biosci.2(12), 57-64, December 2012

Certification:

IJB 2012 [Generate Certificate]

Abstract

This experiment was conducted to evaluate the combined effects of ethylene di amine tetra acetic acid (EDTA) and microbial phytase (MP) on digestibility of calcium and phosphorus and mineralization parameters of tibia bone in broilers chicks. This experiment was conducted using 360 Ross-308 male broiler chicks. In a completely randomized design with a 3×2 factorial arrangement (0, 0.1 and 0.2% EDTA and 0 and 500 FTU MP). Four replicate of 15 chicks per each were fed dietary treatments including (i) P-deficient basal diet [0.2% available phosphorus (aP)] (NC); (ii) NC + 500 FTU MP per kilogram of diet; (iii) NC + 0.1% EDTA per kilogram of diet; (iv) NC + 0.1% EDTA + 500 FTU MP per kilogram of diet; (v) NC + 0.2% EDTA per kilogram; and (vi) NC + 0.2% EDTA + 500 FTU MP per kilogram of diet. The content of calcium, phosphorus and length of tibia bone, digestibility of calcium and phosphorus was evaluated. The results showed that interaction effect of EDTA×MP on tibia calcium content to low available phosphorus diets was significant (p<0.01). Adding of EDTA to P-deficient diets, was increased tibia phosphorus content of broilers in compared with control group (p<0.001). Adding MP to P-deficient diets, based on corn-soybean meal, cause increased digestibility of phosphorus and also, length of tibia in broilers (p<0.0001). From this study it could be deduced that adding of MP to low available phosphorus diets can cause improvement of utilization of phytate phosphorus. Also adding EDTA as a chelator to diet can improve tibia mineralization parameters in broilers.

VIEWS 1

Copyright © 2012
By Authors and International Network for
Natural Sciences (INNSPUB)
http://innspub.net
This article is published under the terms of the Creative
Commons Attribution Liscense 4.0

Effects of combination of ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid and microbial phytase on digestibility of calcium, phosphorous and mineralization parameters of tibia bone in broilers

Ahmad T, Rasool S, Sarwar M, Haq A and Hasan Zia-ul. 2000. Effect of microbial phytase produced from a fungus Aspergillus Niger on bioavailability of phosphorus and calcium in broiler chicken. Animal Feed Science and Technology 83, 103-114.

Angel R, Dhandu AS, Applegate TJ and Christman M. 2001. Phosphorus sparing effect of phytase, 25-hydroxycholecalciferol, and citric acid when fed to broiler chicks. Poultry Science 80 (Suppl.),133-134 (Abstr.)

Association of Official Analytical Chemists. 1995. 4. Animal feeds. Official Methods of Analysis. Association of Official Analytical Chemists, Washington, DC.

Biehl RR, Baker DH and Deluca HF. 1995. 1-α-hydroxylatedcholecalciferol compounds act additively with microbial phytase to improve phosphorous, zinc, and manganese utilization in chicks fed soy-based diets. Journal of Nutrition 125, 2407-2416.

Biehl RR and Baker DH.  1996.  Efficacy  of supplemental 1-α-hydroxycholecalciferol and microbial phytase for young pigs fed phosphorus or amino acid deficient corn-soybean meal diets. Journal of Animal Science 74, 2960-2966.

Boling SD, Webel DM, Marromichalis I, Parsons CM and Baker DH. 2000. The effects of citric acid on phytate phosphorus utilization in young chicks and pigs. Journal of Animal Science 78, 682-689.

Boling-Frankenbach SD, Snow JL, Parsons CM and Baker DH. 2001. The effect of citric acid on the calcium and phosphorus requirements of chicks fed corn-soybean meal diets. Poultry Science 80, 783-788.

Ebrahim-Nezhad Y, Habibi Bibalani G, Jafari Helan E, Hatefi Nezhad K, Dolgari Sharaf J and Ebrahim-Nezhad R. 2008. The effects of combination of ethylene di amine tetra acetic acid and microbial phytase on the concentration of some minerals of serum in laying hens. Asian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances 3 (5), 351-356.

Edwards HMJr. 1993. Dietary 1, 25-dihydroxycholecalciferol supplementation increases natural phytate phosphorous utilization in chickens. Journal of Nutrition 123, 567-577.

Edwards HMJr. 2002. Studies on the efficacy of cholecalciferol and derivatives for stimulating phytate utilization in broiler. Poultry Science 81, 1026-1031.

Fenton TW and Fenton M. 1979. Determination of chromic oxide in feed and feces. Canadian Journal of Animal Science 58, 631-634.

Gordon RW and Roland DASr. 1997. Performance of commercial laying hens fed various phosphorus levels, with and without supplemental phytase. Poultry Science 76, 1172-1177.

Kratzer FH, Alfred JB, Davis PN, Marshall BJ and Vohra P. 1959. The effect of autoclaving soybean protein and the addition of ethylene di amine tetra acetic acid on biological availability zinc for turkey poults. Journal of Nutrition 68, 313-316.

Maenz DD, Engele-Schann CM, Newkirk RW and Classen HL. 1999. The effect of minerals and mineral chelators on the formation of phytate-resistant and phytase-susceptible forms of phytic acid in solution and in slurry of canola meal. Animal Feed Science and Technology 77, 177-192.

National Research Council. 1994. Nutrient requirements of poultry. 9th edition National Academy Press Washington, D.C., U.S.A.

Nelson TS. 1976. The hydrolysis of phytate phosphorus by chicks and laying hens. Poultry Science 55, 2262-2267.

Nielsen FH, Sunde ML and Hoekstra WG. 1966. Effect of some dietary synthetic and natural chelating agents on the zinc-deficiency syndrome in the chick. Journal of Nutrition 89, 35-42.

O’Dell BL, Yohe JM and Savage JE. 1964. Zinc availability in the chick as affected by phytate, calcium and ethylenediamine teraacetate. Poultry Science 43, 415-419.

Perney KM, Cantor AH, Straw ML and Herkelman KL. 1993. The effect of dietary phytase on growth performance and phosphorus utilization of broiler chickens. Poultry Science 72, 2106-2114.

Qian H, Kornegay ET, Ravindran V and Denbow DM. 1996. Effects of supplemental phytase and phosphorus on histological and others tibial bone characteristics and performances of broilers fed semi-purified diets. Poultry Science 75, 618-626.

Rafacz KA, Martinez C, Snow JL, Baker DH and Parsons CM. 2003. Citric acid improves phytate phosphorus utilization in two breeds of chicks fed a corn-soybean meal diets. Poultry Science 82 (Suppl.1), 142. (Abstr.).

Ravindran V, Cabahug S, Selle PH and Bryden WL. 2000. Response of broiler chickens to microbial phytase supplementation as influenced by dietary phytic acid and non-phytate phosphorus levels. II. Effects on apparent metabolizable energy, nutrient digestibility and nutrient retention. British Poultry Science 41, 193-200.

SAS Institute. 1990. SAS/STAT User’s Guide: Statistics. Release 6.04 ed. SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC.

Sebastian S, Touchburm SP, Chavez ER and Lague PC. 1996. The effect of supplemental microbial phytase on the performance and utilization of dietary calcium, phosphorus, copper and zinc in broiler chickens fed corn–soybean diets. Poultry Science 75, 729-736.

Selle  PH, Ravindran V, Caldwell RA and Bryden WL. 2000. Phytate and phytase: consequences for protein utilization. Nutrition Research Reviews 13, 255-278.

Snow JL, Baker DH and Parsons CM. 2004. Phytase, citric acid, and 1-α-hydroxycholecalciferol improve phytate phosphorus utilization in chicks fed a corn-soybean meal diet. Poultry Science 83, 1187-1192.

Viveros A, Brenes A, Arija I and Centeno C. 2002. Effects of microbial phytase supplementation on mineral utilization and serum enzyme activities in broiler  chicks  fed  different  levels  of  phosphorus. Poultry Science 81, 1172-1183.

Vohra  P  and  Kratzer  FH. 1965.  Influence  of various chelating agents on the availability of zinc. Journal of Nutrition 82, 249-256.

SUBMIT MANUSCRIPT

Style Switcher

Select Layout
Chose Color
Chose Pattren
Chose Background