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Research Paper | January 1, 2022

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Fish molasses as indigenous nutrient source in the growth and yield of economically important vegetables in simple nutrient addition program (SNAP) hydroponics system

Maria Danesa S. Rabia

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Int. J. Biosci.20(1), 155-162, January 2022

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12692/ijb/20.1.155-162

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Abstract

Simple Nutrient Addition Production (SNAP) hydroponics production system in this system any container with cover can be used as long as it can contain approximately 2 liters of solution. This study was conducted to evaluate the performance of economically important vegetables grown in SNAP hydroponics and conventional production system. The experimental was laid out in a simple Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD) with three replications. The variable used was method of growing that consists of conventional (Container gardening) and SNAP hydroponics using fish molasses. Among of the four vegetables grown sweet pepper and lettuce performed well under the SNAP hydroponics system. The plants were taller, produced more leaves, matured earlier and had higher yield compared to those grown under the conventional production system. Both the broccoli and tomato did not perform well in SNAP hydroponics and conventional production system. Broccoli was succumbed by the attack of pest (Helecoverpa armegera ) while tomato was lodged due to strong winds.

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Fish molasses as indigenous nutrient source in the growth and yield of economically important vegetables in simple nutrient addition program (SNAP) hydroponics system

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