Inventorying of agro-biodiversity of Province Gligit-Balistan Pakistan

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Research Paper 01/08/2014
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Inventorying of agro-biodiversity of Province Gligit-Balistan Pakistan

Sujjad Hyder, Surayya Khatoon, SherWali Khan, Shaukat Ali, Muhammad Akbar, Nasiba Ibrahim, Ehsan Ali
Int. J. Agron. Agri. Res.5( 2), 134-138, August 2014.
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Abstract

The current baseline study of agro-diversity was carried out in the different seasons of the year 2013. The study area was thoroughly surveyed throughout the year to ensure the collection of maximum agro diversity. The current study focus to provide inventory of 74 cultivated flowering plant diversity exists in the study area. For this purpose we collected the plant specimen from different localities of the study area and identified with the help of Flora of Pakistan. Beside the inventory present study also provides the names of each species in four different locally spoken languages at Gilgit-Baltistan. The collected data was consisted 20 tree species which belongs to 13 genera and 9 families, while the cultivated crops were consisted 54 species which belongs to 42 genera and 17 families. The prime aim of this research is to provide the inclusive scientific inventory of agro-biodiversity with local names in dominantly spoken languages at Gilgit-Baltistan.

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