Microbial profile and antibiogram of isolates from diabetic foot ulcer in Tertiary Health Care Hospital of Central India

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Research Paper 27/07/2023
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Microbial profile and antibiogram of isolates from diabetic foot ulcer in Tertiary Health Care Hospital of Central India

Rupam Gahlot, Suchita Gaur, Chaitanya Nigam, Neha Singh
Int. J. Micro. Myco.23( 1), 14-20, July 2023.
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Abstract

To estimate the microbial profile and antibiogram of isolates from diabetic foot ulcer in tertiary care hospital of central India. This is a cross-sectional observational study conducted in patients presenting with diabetic foot ulcer in OPDs and admitted in tertiary care hospital of Chhattisgarh. Foot ulcer grading was done using Wagner’s classification. Samples processing, isolation and identification of positive isolates was done using standard microbiological procedures. Antimicrobial susceptibility was evaluated using CLSI guidelines. Total 30 patients of diabetic foot ulcer were included. Most common age group affected was 31-60 years (66.7%) followed by 61-90 years (26.7%). Male to female ratio was 2:1. Mean duration of diabetes was 3.36 years with minimum duration 10 days and maximum duration 20 years in study patients. According to Wagner’s grading, most common grade of ulcer was grade 1 (33.3%) followed by grade 2 (30%) and 3(30%). Peripheral neuropathy was associated in all cases and 43.3% showed association with hypertension. Most common site of diabetic ulcer was right foot 21 (70%) and dorsum of foot 17 (56.7%). Most common organism isolate was Pseudomonas aeruginosa (30%), followed by E. coli (25%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (25%). Among Gram positive most common organism isolate was Staphylococcus aureus (15%). Imipenem and Meropenem were found to be effective drugs for Gram-negative organisms. For Gram-positive coverage Gentamycin and cephalosporins was found to be effective. Early diagnosis, prompt patient care and implementation of strict antimicrobial stewardship practices are crucial for treatment of diabetic foot ulcer.

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